I know you can get this at Wine.com, but I think (and hope) you can find it at many more outlets. If you do, buy some. Especially if you haven't tried French wine, and specifically Bordeaux, but would like to...out of curiosity, if nothing else. So try this Wine-Flair Wine of the Week! Bordeaux wines come in two broad categories: left bank, based on Cabernet Sauvignon, and right bank, based on Merlot. "Bank" refers to the rivers Garonne and Dordogne, which meet northwest of the city of Bordeaux and flow into the Gironde estuary, which extends for about 75 miles into the Atlantic. There's more to it, and if you want to know more, go here. Anyway, every classified Bordeaux…

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California Cabernets, especially from Napa, are well known for their power, richness, tannin, high alcohol...and too often, astronomical price. Those in the "cult" category such as Screaming Eagle or Harlan Estate can fetch hundreds of dollars or more per bottle, and are difficult or impossible to get unless you're a "VIP" customer and on the allocation list. Don't get me wrong: there are some outstanding Napa (and Sonoma, for that matter) Cabs at "fairly reasonable" prices and they, too, have a devoted following, albeit among us normal folk. And given that I'm a #1 fan of Bordeaux, years ago I discovered "Meritage" wines, produced by a group of American vintners that formed The Meritage Alliance in 1998 to produce and…

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I’ve just tried two very different but very delicious Paso Robles gems. Here they are: Folkway Revelator 2016: This Bordeaux-like blend sells for about $25 (or less) and is about half Cabernet Sauvignon, one quarter Cab Franc and one quarter Merlot. Deep red, very balanced with noticeable but polished tannins and flavors of black cherry, coffee and cocoa. Villa San Juliette Chorum Reserve Red 2014: A truly extraordinary and almost unheard-of blend of 32% Syrah, 16% Grenache, 14% Petit Verdot, 12% Cabernet Franc, 12% Alicante Bouschet, 7% Cabernet Sauvignon and 7% Petite Sirah. Dark fruit with a lot of plum and black cherry, and a hint of mint. I think I enjoy this most of all because I’d love to…

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Movies about wine are relatively few, and good ones are as rare as a 1961 Hermitage La Chapelle. Here's an overview of a couple worth seeing, and some educational ones, too. Bottle Shock Bottle Shock, which was independently released in the United States in August of '08, is available on video. The movie is supposed to tell at least part of the story of "The Judgment of Paris," that game-changing event in 1976 when a Chardonnay from Napa's Chateau Montelena and a Cabernet Sauvignon from Stag's Leap Wine Cellars beat some of the top French wines. In a blind taste test. In Paris. With some of France's top wine experts as judges. Mon Dieu! Problem is, lots of stuff shown…

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Indian Women Driving Up Wine Demand New Zealand Targets the U.S. Market Wine Selection: Clos du Bois Marlstone 2006 (Bordeaux Blend) Wine Category: Cabernet Franc from Long Island The Varietal Character of Red Wines Wine Shopping: What's in a Label? Step up to Sangiovese (Chianti)

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  On April 25 I was privileged to enjoy an evening with Christian Moueix ("Moo-ecks") of Petrus and Dominus fame, as a guest of Sherry-Lehman CEO Chris Adams.  Monsieur Moueix hosted a tasting of his Dominus and Napanook wines, with paired cuisine from Manhattan's Hotel Plaza Athenee.  I've been drinking his wines all my adult life and so I felt like I'd known Christian ever since I'd read Napa: The Story of an American Eden. In that book, one of my five favorite wine books, we hear about how Christian, who'd studied winemaking and viticulture at UC Davis, was first approached by Robert Mondavi who was in Bordeaux for the 1981 harvest, and had met with Christian and suggested that…

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In pursuit of a Sherry-Lehmann-sponsored tasting of the 2006 and 2007 Bordeaux, I wandered over to the Four Seasons restaurant in Manhattan on Saturday afternoon. Given that I've dedicated myself and this site to wine education and wine appreciation rather than ratings and numbers, I'll just list my favorite wines from the tasting and fill in more information if get the time. My very favorite is the Chateau Angelus 2007 from St. Emilion. Granted, everything from this estate is very pricey, as it's a Class B Premier Grand Cru Classe from the rather strange St. Emilion classification system. My second choice is the Chateau Gazin 2006 from Pomerol. I've got a case of the 05 resting comfortably in my cellar, and they may…

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This morning's Decanter online has a story about what seems to be the collapse of the high-end Bordeaux wine market, including En Primeur, the method by which certain European producers offer wine for sale while it's still in the barrel. In other words, you pay for it 12 to 18 months before you can even get your hands on it. You're paying, of course, for the promise of a great vintage (or the heartbreak of a bad one), the prestigious names on the labels, and the cachet of getting a wine that's not for sale in any store. En Primeur applies only to certain wines from Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Rhone and Port wines. In the U.S. and other places, though,…

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Bottle Shock, a movie about the famous "Judgment of Paris" in 1976 when two '73 California wines were judged superior to several esteemed French wines, is now out on DVD and in the rental stores. Go rent it! The big deal? The judging was done in France, it was "blind" (the bottles were covered up and the judges did not know what was in their tasting glasses) and only one of the eleven judges was an American. Another was British, and the rest were the cream of the crop of the French wine and culinary worlds. And only the French scores were counted! While it's not very accurate historically, it's still a lot of fun. It didn't do so well…

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